The Super Sixty Collegiate Development Camp mission is to connect players with NCAA coaches and to educate them about the college recruiting process. NCAA field hockey and soccer coaches run all camp practice sessions and games and host daily seminars on

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Rising Sophomore Summer  - The rising sophomore and rising junior summers are critically important for exposure, and should be made the most of.   The rising sophopmore summer marks the beginning of your core recruiting year (rising sophomore through rising junior summers). Most D-I programs will be identifying players during their rising sophomore summers and sophomore school years.

If there is a particular college program you are especially interested in, attend its summer camp, play days, or clinics.  However, it quickly becomes very expensive to attend more than a couple of these.

The best use of your summer camp funds is to attend the Summer Super Sixty Camp.  With so many coaches at one camp, the exposure is both efficient and reliable, since every camper works with every coach.  The level of play is consistently high amongst campers, making it easier for coaches to identify players. 

Continue to work on athleticism and stick skills. The summer is an ideal time to develop these, since academics, sports and activities consume so much time during the school year.

 

10th grade  - The sophomore year is perhaps the most critical for development and exposure, if you are seeking D-I opportunities. All D-I Coaches will be identifying players during their sophomore year. Talk with your club coach about which tournaments would be beneficial for you to attend.  It is not necessary to attend all events, especially if family finances are limited.  

Play Indoor if you can afford it, to help with developing your stick skills, vision, and awareness.

Attend the Super Sixty January Sophomore Camp, if possible.  This camp is for players interested in D-I opportunities, is ONLY for sophomores, and is a highly productive and reliable exposure event.  Repeated exposure during the sophomore year and rising junior summer will significantly increase your opportunities.

Don’t downplay the importance of continuing to work on athleticism and stick skills.

Work on athleticism.   You can find good examples of exercises for sprint training, agilities, plyometric and core work on YouTube.com.

Work on stick skills. Practicing stick skills at home in your driveway, garage or basement requires only an investment of some balls and cones, but will return many benefits in the future.

Devote sufficient time to academics.  Better academic performance will translate into increased opportunities.  If you are interested in an elite academic D-I school, be sure to take the PSAT during your sophomore year, and any applicable SAT subject tests, so that coaches will be better able to make a preliminary determination of your academic fit for their school.

 

Rising Junior Summer - The rising junior summer is the single most productive time frame to solidify your recruiting opportunities. The larger D-I programs are finishing up on that recruiting class (but still looking for an athlete or two), and the smaller D-I programs (including the Ivies) and all D-II programs are identifying most of their prospects for that class by the end of that summer.  D-III programs are beginning to identify their recruiting class.

If there is a particular college program you are especially interested in, and the coach has specifically invited you to attend a camp or clinic – go to it!   However, attending more than a couple of these is an inefficient way for you to explore multiple opportunities.

The best use of your summer camp funds is to attend the Summer Super Sixty Camp.  With so many coaches at one camp, the exposure is both efficient and reliable, since every camper works with every coach.  The level of play is consistently high amongst campers, making it easier for coaches to identify players.

Continue to work on athleticism and stick skills all summer!

If you are considering an academically elite college, you may want to work on test preparation for the SAT or ACT, which you should take at least once during the fall of your junior year.